April202014

oeuniverse:

In order to become the supreme adult, you must perform the seven wonders:

  • Public speaking
  • Not being afraid of teenagers
  • Calling the doctor yourself
  • Taxes
  • Arguing without crying
  • Having a normal sleep pattern
  • Having an answer to the question ‘what do you want to do with your life?’

(via cyanidelacedcoffee)

April192014
givemeinternet:

In honor of the two conflicting holidays

givemeinternet:

In honor of the two conflicting holidays

(via woodstockoflove)

6PM
stonerette:

danktokez:

nervous-princess:

humanslikeme:

My nug has risen

what

daFUQ no way lmao

It’s a sign


Hahaha

stonerette:

danktokez:

nervous-princess:

humanslikeme:

My nug has risen

what

daFUQ no way lmao

It’s a sign

Hahaha

(via woodstockoflove)

6PM

heydiddlehiddleston:

does your brain ever just produce disturbingly violent thoughts out of nowhere
like terrible, horrible, thoughts
for no reason at all
and then you snap out of it and you’re like 
i don’t want to kill my mom
what the heck

(via how-clever)

6PM

After learning my flight was detained 4 hours,
I heard the announcement:
If anyone in the vicinity of gate 4-A understands any Arabic,
Please come to the gate immediately.

Well—one pauses these days. Gate 4-A was my own gate. I went there.
An older woman in full traditional Palestinian dress,
Just like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing loudly.
Help, said the flight service person. Talk to her. What is her
Problem? we told her the flight was going to be four hours late and she
Did this.

I put my arm around her and spoke to her haltingly.
Shu dow-a, shu- biduck habibti, stani stani schway, min fadlick,
Sho bit se-wee?

The minute she heard any words she knew—however poorly used—
She stopped crying.

She thought our flight had been canceled entirely.
She needed to be in El Paso for some major medical treatment the
Following day. I said no, no, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just late,

Who is picking you up? Let’s call him and tell him.
We called her son and I spoke with him in English.
I told him I would stay with his mother till we got on the plane and
Would ride next to her—Southwest.

She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just for the fun of it.

Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while in Arabic and
Found out of course they had ten shared friends.

Then I thought just for the heck of it why not call some Palestinian
Poets I know and let them chat with her. This all took up about 2 hours.

She was laughing a lot by then. Telling about her life. Answering
Questions.

She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool cookies—little powdered
Sugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and nuts—out of her bag—
And was offering them to all the women at the gate.

To my amazement, not a single woman declined one. It was like a
Sacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the traveler from California,
The lovely woman from Laredo—we were all covered with the same
Powdered sugar. And smiling. There are no better cookies.

And then the airline broke out the free beverages from huge coolers—
Non-alcoholic—and the two little girls for our flight, one African
American, one Mexican American—ran around serving us all apple juice
And lemonade and they were covered with powdered sugar too.

And I noticed my new best friend—by now we were holding hands—
Had a potted plant poking out of her bag, some medicinal thing,

With green furry leaves. Such an old country traveling tradition. Always
Carry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.

And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and thought,
This is the world I want to live in. The shared world.

Not a single person in this gate—once the crying of confusion stopped
—has seemed apprehensive about any other person.

They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women too.
This can still happen anywhere.

Not everything is lost.

Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952), “Wandering Around an Albuquerque Airport Terminal.” I think this poem may be making the rounds, this week, but that’s as it should be.  (via oliviacirce)

When I lose hope in the world, I remember this poem.

(via bookoisseur)

Tears.

(via hillarygayle)

(via truncatedsouls)

5PM
graviton-simulacrum:

gaytiers:

woahsospooky:

overnight-shipping:

veingme:

Glitter Cupcakes!

These look like something that’s been blessed by deep sea mermaids oh lord i need one now

Holy wow

DON’T EAT GLITTER ICING YOU WILL SHIT GLITTER

More likeEAT GLITTER ICING YOU WILL SHIT GLITTER

graviton-simulacrum:

gaytiers:

woahsospooky:

overnight-shipping:

veingme:

Glitter Cupcakes!

These look like something that’s been blessed by deep sea mermaids oh lord i need one now

Holy wow

DON’T EAT GLITTER ICING YOU WILL SHIT GLITTER

More like

EAT GLITTER ICING YOU WILL SHIT GLITTER

(via cyanidelacedcoffee)

5PM
“For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start over again.” F. Scott Fitzgerald  (via nakedvibe)

(Source: nuclearharvest, via eswynn)

3PM
3PM
knitmeapony:

voiceofnature:

So I dyed my cats pink with leftover beet water. No regrets! <3 :D I had to wash them because of some oil spill they had gotten into, and chose to use the beet water, which is perfectly safe. I had no idea it would really make them this pink. 

"I am fucking fabulous."

knitmeapony:

voiceofnature:

So I dyed my cats pink with leftover beet water. No regrets! <3 :D
I had to wash them because of some oil spill they had gotten into, and chose to use the beet water, which is perfectly safe. I had no idea it would really make them this pink.

"I am fucking fabulous."

(via there-are-no-good-urls-left)

3PM
scifigeneration:


First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man’s Skin
Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep’s egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. The resulting egg was implanted in the womb of a third sheep, and the result was Dolly, the first clone of a mammal.
Dolly’s birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern — along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases.
But Dolly’s birth also triggered years of frustration. It’s proved very difficult to do that same sort of DNA transfer into a human egg.
Last year, scientists in Oregon said they’d finally done it, using DNA taken from infants. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes.
"There are many diseases, whether it’s diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, that usually increase with age," Lanza says. So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people — not just cells from infants — to create therapies for adult diseases.
Lanza’s colleagues, including Young Gie Chung at the CHA Stem Cell Institute in Seoul, Korea (with labs in Los Angeles as well), now report success.
Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. As with Dolly, the women’s nuclear DNA had been removed from these eggs before the man’s DNA was injected. They repeated the process — this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man.
"What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says.
They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, “so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want,” Lanza says.
They look like the cells in a human embryo — in fact, they’re called embryonic stem cells. And with a bit of coaxing, these cells could, theoretically, be prodded to turn into any sort of human cell — nerve, heart, liver and pancreas, for example. That’s what makes them potentially useful for treating all sorts of diseases.
In the 18 years since researchers cloned a sheep, scientists have found another way to produce cloned human cell lines. And the other technique, which produces “induced pluripotent stem cells,” skips the step that requires a human egg cell, so some people find it less fraught, ethically.
It also means that finally getting the sheep technology to work with cells from adult humans may not turn out to be a turning point for this technology, after all.
"We now have two ways and we’re not sure which of the two methods is likely to work best," Lanza says.
Ideally he would like to screen millions of adults and choose just a hundred or so whose genes would make them good DNA donors. He’d like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes.
In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients — just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors.
Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant — creating a patient-specific treatment — though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells.
Paul Knoepfler at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine is excited about this advance from a medical point of view. But he says this does mean we could be getting closer to being able to go beyond cloned cell lines to cloning an entire human being.
"I don’t think that’s coming anytime soon, but certainly this kind of technology could be abused by some kind of rogue scientist," Knoepfler says.
And while many people consider that idea dangerous and repugnant, it is not broadly illegal.
source

via s-c-i-guy

scifigeneration:

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From A Man’s Skin

Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep’s egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. The resulting egg was implanted in the womb of a third sheep, and the result was Dolly, the first clone of a mammal.

Dolly’s birth set off a huge outpouring of ethical concern — along with hope that the same techniques, applied to human cells, could be used to treat myriad diseases.

But Dolly’s birth also triggered years of frustration. It’s proved very difficult to do that same sort of DNA transfer into a human egg.

Last year, scientists in Oregon said they’d finally done it, using DNA taken from infants. Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes.

"There are many diseases, whether it’s diabetes, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease, that usually increase with age," Lanza says. So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people — not just cells from infants — to create therapies for adult diseases.

Lanza’s colleagues, including Young Gie Chung at the CHA Stem Cell Institute in Seoul, Korea (with labs in Los Angeles as well), now report success.

Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell, they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. As with Dolly, the women’s nuclear DNA had been removed from these eggs before the man’s DNA was injected. They repeated the process — this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man.

"What we show for the first time is that you can actually take skin cells, from a middle-aged 35-year-old male, but also from an elderly, 75-year-old male" and use the DNA from those cells in this cloning process, Lanza says.

They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. Each of those two cells is able to divide indefinitely, “so from a small vial of those cells we could grow up as many cells as we would ever want,” Lanza says.

They look like the cells in a human embryo — in fact, they’re called embryonic stem cells. And with a bit of coaxing, these cells could, theoretically, be prodded to turn into any sort of human cell — nerve, heart, liver and pancreas, for example. That’s what makes them potentially useful for treating all sorts of diseases.

In the 18 years since researchers cloned a sheep, scientists have found another way to produce cloned human cell lines. And the other technique, which produces “induced pluripotent stem cells,” skips the step that requires a human egg cell, so some people find it less fraught, ethically.

It also means that finally getting the sheep technology to work with cells from adult humans may not turn out to be a turning point for this technology, after all.

"We now have two ways and we’re not sure which of the two methods is likely to work best," Lanza says.

Ideally he would like to screen millions of adults and choose just a hundred or so whose genes would make them good DNA donors. He’d like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes.

In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients — just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors.

Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant — creating a patient-specific treatment — though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells.

Paul Knoepfler at the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine is excited about this advance from a medical point of view. But he says this does mean we could be getting closer to being able to go beyond cloned cell lines to cloning an entire human being.

"I don’t think that’s coming anytime soon, but certainly this kind of technology could be abused by some kind of rogue scientist," Knoepfler says.

And while many people consider that idea dangerous and repugnant, it is not broadly illegal.

source

via s-c-i-guy

(via eswynn)

3PM

fashion-runways:

Vera Wang Fall Winter Bridal Collection 2012 

(via cyanidelacedcoffee)

3PM

American Horror Story: Easter

(Source: gingerdeer, via megustamemes)

3PM

pemsylvania:

i know a girl named faith who is an atheist and she thinks thats the funniest thing ever 

(via cyanidelacedcoffee)

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